Bills before Congress would allow use of Health Savings Accounts for Direct Primary Care Dues

HSAs are a type of savings account that allows people to set aside money before taxes to pay for qualified medical expenses such as deductibles, copayments, and coinsurance. Some in Congress want to extend those qualified medical expenses to include dues that members pay to direct primary care practices. Because DPCs don’t accept insurance or payment from third-party payers, they can offer unlimited primary care for typically less than $100 per month.

Bills Would Broaden HSAs

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) introduced S. 12, the Health Savings Act of 2019. Cosponsored by Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), the legislation would expand what qualifies as a valid expense for the use of HSAs. Under current law, the Internal Revenue Service handles DPC fees differently from insurance premiums and copays, which are qualified expenses.

In the House, Rep. Mike Gallagher (R-WI) introduced H.R. 603, the Health Savings Account Expansion Act of 2019. The legislation would increase the maximum allowed contribution amount, repeal the restriction on using HSAs for over-the-counter medications, remove the requirement that a person with an HSA also be enrolled in a high-deductible health insurance plan, and allow the use of HSAs to pay for health insurance premiums and direct primary care service arrangements.

 

Read the full article at The Heartland Institute.

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