Direct primary care can rein in America’s out-of-control healthcare costs

D4PC_Op_ed

By: Dr. Lee Gross

While Democrats and Republicans debate the merits and drawbacks of reforming America’s broken health insurance system, few policymakers are paying attention to perhaps the biggest reason health insurance is so expensive: The actual cost of healthcare, which insurers have to pay, is out of control.

There are many reasons the cost of providing healthcare has been steadily rising in most sectors of the healthcare industry. One of the most important is that the traditional health insurance model wastes piles of cash. It pays health insurers to act as middlemen between patients and their doctors. Patients continue to use their health insurance to pay for virtually every healthcare service, including those that they could easily pay for on their own, like primary care visits, flu shots, and routine exams.

Insurers’ involvement in nearly every primary care visit is causing healthcare expenses to skyrocket. Patients are being forced to pay extra so insurance companies can facilitate transactions they really don’t need to be involved in. Not only does this cause the cost of primary care services to rise, it also forces doctors to squander time filling out paperwork instead of treating patients. Some doctors choose to hire more staff to handle much of the administrative work, also contributing to the rising cost of providing primary care.

As I recently noted in testimony before the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, “We don’t expect our homeowner’s insurance to pay for blown light bulbs or routine maintenance. Imagine how complex and expensive it would be to purchase gasoline if we used our auto insurance to pay for fuel. This is what we expect from our health insurance, yet we are surprised that it is expensive, inefficient, and impersonal.”

Fortunately, there is a better way to provide primary care, one that offers high-quality healthcare services for much less money and without inflicting mountains of complicated insurance paperwork and government regulations on doctors.

Direct primary care is a membership-based primary care model that provides patients with a set number of healthcare services in exchange for a flat monthly fee. At Epiphany Health, the direct primary care practice I founded in North Port, Fla., we charge just $65 per month for an adult membership and $25 for one child. (A membership for each additional child is just $10.) A family of four pays only $155 per month.

In exchange for that fee, we offer all of our members the primary care services they need most often, including physical exams, EKG testing, strep and urine testing, blood-thinner monitoring, minor surgical procedures, joint injections, and much more. Patients don’t pay a single penny more for these services beyond the cost of their membership fee.

Read the full op-ed at the Washington Examiner.

 

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